Archive For: Digital Transformation

Our SMART-est Resources on Digital Transformation

A recent review of Denovati SMART Articles revealed that our most popular content falls into two categories: conceptual and tactical pieces on the digital transformation of organizations, and practical insights and how-to guidance on leveraging social and digital technologies. Here are links to our most-read resources on digital transformation.
 

Five Key Digital Transformation Mistakes

Key digital transformation mistakes include not having an executive in charge,inadequate leadership buy-in and support,having decisions related to social and digital technologies made by people who lack sophistication, multiple fragmented, tactical approaches rather than a unified approach that is strategic and integrated, and executives who lack the proper perspective on revenues and expenses.
 

Change in the Digital Era: Both Too Fast and Too Slow

Assessing the pace of change in the Digital Era depends on whether we're talking about technology or people and human systems. The former is advancing at lightning speed, the latter at a snail's pace. As the Digital Era progresses, technological capabilities continue to outstrip our capacity to address the opportunities and challenges they present. We need to bridge (or at least narrow) the digital divide and enable humans and human systems to evolve more in concert with technology. It won't be easy.
 

Technological Innovation and Strategy: Beyond Disruption

Rather than viewing the impact of technological innovation on established firms as either competence-destroying or competence-enhancing, business leaders should consider their competence-extending possibilities. This article explores the notion and provides examples of businesses that have successfully adapted their strategies to incorporate new social and digital technologies.
 

Creating a Digital Transformation Plan of Action: A Guide for Leaders

Built on a foundation of guiding principles, a digital transformation plan of action includes nine main initiatives that organizational leaders should take. Beginning with educating themselves to increase their own digital competencies, these initiatives include soliciting input from key stakeholders, revising the organization’s mission, business model, and offerings, leveraging technology to enhance internal processes, and ensuring the digital literacy of their workforce.
 

The Digital Transformation of Business Schools: The Dean’s To Do List

Building on an assessment of where business schools are in their digital transformation journeys, this essay proposes a plan of action that will enable business school leaders to adapt to Digital Era realities and demonstrate Digital Era leadership. Guided by principles like the recognition that digital transformation is a marathon not a sprint, action items include having senior leaders participate in a Digital Transformation Masterclass, reviewing and revising the curriculum, and adding a digital dimension to research agendas and faculty expertise.
 

A Digital Transformation Framework, using a Bricks-and-Mortar Metaphor

This digital transformation framework calls for strategic leadership as the architect and is built on a foundation of strategic goals and objectives.The building blocks are tactical leadership, governance, digital competencies, education and training, and change management. An organization's culture is the mortar that connects and binds everything together. Each element requires a unique set of considerations that differ from traditional success factors, and in some cases are unprecedented. Many Industrial Era mental models, principles, priorities, and processes are not transferable to or effective in the Digital Era.
 

Assessing the Digital Transformation of Business Schools

This Social Media Today Best Thinkers piece offers a quick assessment of where business schools are in their digital transformation journeys, provides examples of the possibilities being exploited by some leading schools, and highlights areas that require greater attention. A follow-up piece offers suggestions for how business school leaders can continue to adapt to Digital Era realities and demonstrate Digital Era leadership.
 

How Much Is Digital Illiteracy Costing Your Organization?

The costs of digital illiteracy for organizations include general inefficiency and ineffectiveness as workers go about performing their job duties, compromised communication and collaboration, wasted investments in technology tools and platforms that are underutilized, suboptimized pursuit of strategic goals and objectives, and reputational effects.
 

The Enterprise Implications of the Internet of Things

In a webcast recorded for the DCIA's IoT Marathon at the International CES (#CES2015), Denovati Founder Courtney Hunt discusses the opportunities and challenges the internet of things creates for enterprises of all types, including public sector entities, hospitals, and academic institutions. Particular emphasis is placed on human capital management implications, as well as challenges created in terms of leadership, staffing, ethics and regulations, and cybersecurity.
 

The Digital Transformation of Business Functions

As organizations become digital enterprises, various business functions – and the professionals who work in them – will be digitally transformed as well. External applications of social and digital technologies like marketing and sales are just the tip of the iceberg. Internal applications and implications will be far more extensive and significant, and virtually all functions and jobs will have a digital dimension to them. This essay offers food for thought and examples along these lines…
 

We’re All Becoming Tech Workers… And We Need to Be Ready

As the Digital Era continues to progress and social and digital technologies become more fully integrated into not just the work we do, but how we do it, there's an increasing need for all workers to be digitally literate and competent. Here are some of the things organizations, organizational leaders, and individuals can and should do to increase current capabilities and lay a foundation for ongoing growth and development.
 

Digital Property is Real Property: 5 Ways to Treat it That Way

Recognizing and respecting that digital property is in fact "real" property requires organizations to (1) make sure they own their own domain name(s) and lay claim to related social media properties, (2) require all official email be sent via domain-linked accounts, (3) take cybersecurity seriously, (4) maintain a presentable web presence, and (5) create policies and procedures (and commit necessary resources) to maintain digital property in the best possible condition at all times. (August 9, 2014)
 

Culture Change is Critical for Successful Digital Transformation

Adopting digital technologies is not about replacing an existing system with an upgrade or building a new website. Rather one of the most important impacts of these technologies is to essentially change the way people work. Adopting digital technologies needs to be seen as first and foremost a culture change or probably more appropriately a transformation of their culture. For the full value of the technologies to be realised, people will have to change their mindset and their behaviour.
 

Becoming a Digital Organization: A Three-Phase Journey

There are three main phases to becoming a digital organization: digitization, digital engagement, and digital transformation. This post offers a lay oriented description and assessment of these phases. The objective is to help leaders who are digital rookies develop a conceptual foundation for understanding where their organizations have been, where they are, and – most importantly – where they need to think about taking them.
 

The New Digital Divide: Thoughts for Leaders and Laggards

The digital divide has increasingly become about knowledge and adoption of new technologies rather than access. Which side of the divide are you on - are you a leader or a laggard? This post offers insights into the factors contributing to the growing chasm between those who have embraced and leveraged new technologies and those who haven’t. It also offers suggestions for bridging and crossing the divide. Dialogue is encouraged and insights and questions from others are welcome.
 

5 Main Barriers to Digital Engagement

There are five main barriers to digital engagement by organizations, their leaders, and other senior professionals. This post describes those barriers - including lack of knowledge and understanding, framing that leads to risk aversion, poor/no roadmaps, and inadequate resource allocation - as well as the factors that will help break them down. Additional insights are welcome.
 

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